About this event

  • Date and time Wed 11 Mar 2020 from 8:45am to 5:30pm
  • Location Royal Society of Medicine
  • Organised by Respiratory Medicine

The Royal Society of Medicine commemorates The World TB Day with an annual meeting to review the most relevant advances in clinical, public health and scientific aspects of tuberculosis.

The World TB Day, on March 24th, is designed to build public awareness that tuberculosis today remains an epidemic in much of the world, causing the deaths of nearly one-and-a-half million people each year, mostly in developing countries. It commemorates the day in 1882 when Dr Robert Koch announced that he had discovered the cause of tuberculosis, the TB bacillus. At the time of Koch's announcement in Berlin, TB was raging through Europe and the Americas, causing the death of one out of every seven people. Koch's discovery opened the way towards diagnosing and curing TB.

Agenda

View the programme

Registration tea and coffee
Introduction to the day

Professor Ajit Lalvani, Chair of Infectious Diseases, Director, Tuberculosis Research Centre, Director, NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Respiratory Infections, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London.

Public health and clinical challenges, undeserved populations

New ten year national TB strategy

TBC

Find and treat model: The homeless and other high-risk groups

Dr Al Story, Clinical Lead, University College London Hospitals

Doctors of the world model: Vulnerable immigrants including refugees

TBC

A clinical perspective on delayed diagnosis and consequences for transmission

TBC

How can we improve outbreak investigations to curtail transmission?

TBC

Tea and coffee break

What are the clinical, epidemiological, environmental and microbiological factors affecting transmission?

What are the clinical, epidemiological, environmental and microbiological factors affecting transmission?

TBC

TB transmission in the UK: How can we harness whole genome sequencing to reduce transmission?
Development of the first costing tool for contact investigations in the NHS

TBC

Questions and answers with expert panel
Lunch

Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM): clinical and public health relevance

The burden of NTM infection

Professor Michael Loebinger, Professor of Practice Respiratory Medicine, Imperial College, London, Consultant Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital, London,Clinical Director Laboratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London

Illustrative clinical cases representing the main types of NTM burden in the UK

TBC

Evidence of local, national and international transmission of NTM and impact on infection control guidelines

TBC

QA Relevance of NTM transmission to routine clinical and public health practice

TBC

Tea and coffee break
An international outbreak of nosocomial NTM transmission with high case fatality

Meera Chand, Consultant Microbiologist, Public Health England, Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

John Crofton memorial lecture

Why do some of us resist acquiring TB infection despite repeated exposure?

TBC

Questions and answers with expert panel
Drinks reception

Location

Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole St, Marylebone, London, W1G 0AE, United Kingdom