About this event

  • Date and time Thu 7 Feb 2019 from 9:00am to 4:45pm
  • Location Royal Society of Medicine
  • Organised by Global Health

The elective period is a key part of undergraduate medical studies in the uk and in many other countries.

A great deal of research has been devoted to understanding electives - with a focus on the impact on students and their sending and hosting institutions.

In recent years, there have been very few recent changes in these key areas:

  • Where students go
  • The extent of their pre-departure training
  • Post-return discussions
  • Join us as we use evidence to assess the existing challenges and their implications in the UK and abroad.

The conference will place medical electives within a broad global health context, examining the implications of electives for equity, inequality and reciprocity.

 

Workshop summaries 

Closing the loop of learning experience 
Led by: Ann Wylie, Global Health and electives module lead, King’s College London. 

Electives are often seen as the highlight of the medical curriculum, looked forward to with great enthusiasm.  Considerable investment, time and money is involved by all protagonists in the planning, preparing and approval of electives but what about post- elective? Has the planned learning taken place and if so how do we know; do students feel it was “value for money”; have there been any negative or sub-optimal experiences and what support is needed/provided? What will be the long benefits of the elective. We will explore these questions from the student perspective and share the variable approaches to the post elective period. 

Pre-departure training 
Led by:  Dr. Chris Willott, Education Lead, King’s Centre for Global Health and Health Partnerships. 

Students at UK medical schools receive a wide variety of different types and levels of training before they depart for their electives. In this workshop we will discuss the value of pre-departure training and whether it should be made compulsory nationally, in order to fully prepare students for their experiences. 

Ethical electives: what are they and how do I achieve it? 
Led by:  Katy Daniels, Electives Lead, University of Dundee. 

Electives are an amazing opportunity and many students choose low income countries for this learning experience, but do we consider the ethical implications of this? We will explore what these ethical issues are, some thoughts on best practice and ways to make electives in low-income countries more ethical at an individual and medical school level. 

The educational value of medical electives 
Led by: Bal Bajaj, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology, University of Swansea. 

Electives are seen as a vital part of a student’s experience, but the extent to which they provide real education value for students has not been fully explored in the literature. In this workshop we seek to get to grips with this dilemma, examining ways in which students may benefit from their period on elective, and the way this can have impacts during their medical careers. 

Key speakers

Maria Keerig

Maria Keerig was born and raised in Saint Petersburg (then Leningrad) and came to study medicine in the UK through gaining scholarship support. She has worked as an educator at the Leicester Medical School for just under a decade and is a Specialist GP educator and the lead for medical electives, in addition to being a GP. 

Maria is also involved in the work of UK Medical Electives Committee, which is part of Medical Schools Council UK, and became its Deputy Lead last year.

Agenda

View the programme

Registration, tea and coffee
Welcome and introduction

Dr Chris Willott, Lecturer in Global Health, King's College London

Panel discussion

Bal Bajaj, Katy Daniels, B Sethia, Mark Clarfield and Anita Berlin

Tea and coffee break
Designing an incoming electives programme

Mark Clarfield

Lunch

Workshops

Closing the loop of learning experience

Led by: Ann Wylie, Global Health and electives module lead, King’s College London.

Electives are often seen as the highlight of the medical curriculum, looked forward to with great enthusiasm.  Considerable investment, time and money is involved by all protagonists in the planning, preparing and approval of electives but what about post- elective? Has the planed learning taken place and if so how do we know; do students feel it was “value for money”; have there been any negative or sub-optimal experiences and what support is needed/provided? What will be the long benefits of the elective. We will explore these questions from the student perspective and share the variable approaches to the post elective period.

Pre-departure training

Led by:  Dr. Chris Willott, Education Lead, King’s Centre for Global Health and Health Partnerships.

Students at UK medical schools receive a wide variety of different types and levels of training before they depart for their electives. In this workshop we will discuss the value of pre-departure training and whether it should be made compulsory nationally, in order to fully prepare students for their experiences.

Ethical electives: What are they and how do I achieve it?

Led by:  Katy Daniels, Electives Lead, University of Dundee.

Electives are an amazing opportunity and many students choose low income countries for this learning experience, but do we consider the ethical implications of this? We will explore what these ethical issues are, some thoughts on best practice and ways to make electives in low-income countries more ethical at an individual and medical school level.

The educational value of medical electives

Led by: Bal Bajaj, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology, University of Swansea.

Electives are seen as a vital part of a student’s experience, but the extent to which they provide real education value for students has not been fully explored in the literature. In this workshop we seek to get to grips with this dilemma, examining ways in which students may benefit from their period on elective, and the way this can have impacts during their medical careers.

Tea and coffee break
Keynote

Maria Keerig

Panel discussion

Ann Wylie

Closing address

Chris Willott

Location

Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole St, Marylebone, London, W1G 0AE, United Kingdom