About this event

  • Date and time Thu 24 Jun 2021 from 10:00am to 3:05pm
  • Location Online
  • Organised by Critical Care Medicine

This prestigious biennial webinar will offer multidisciplinary expert perspective on the recovery of critically ill patients with complex needs. 

National and international leaders across the field of critical care will provide a summary on various aspects of the recovery pathway after critical illness - including demography, the impact of physical, psychological, cognitive, nutritional and economic sequelae, and highlight some of the very latest clinical trials.

Join us to discover the importance of a multidisciplinary recovery pathway delivered across the field of critical care and to examine current researches on how we could bring together a team that is focused on improving all aspects of the experience of survivorship following critical illness.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS 

Critical Care Medicine Section: Poster prize

Prize: £250

Submission deadline: Tuesday 26 January 2021

Open to: To all UK trainees

Application guidelines:

Submit an abstract based on any topic relating to recovery after critical care of no more than 250 words (excluding title, authors and references). The best abstracts will be selected to present a poster at the meeting on Friday 26 March 2021

To find out more or submit an abstract, please click here.

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Tickets

Standard pricing available until 24 June 2021.

Member

RSM Member RSM Trainee RSM Student
£0.00 £0.00 £0.00

Non - Member

Non - Member Trainee Student
£60.00 £45.00 £30.00

Key speakers

Professor Stephen Brett

Professor of Critical Care, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London and Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Dr Eve Corner

Lecturer in Physiotherapy, Brunel University London

Penelope Firshman

Clinical Lead Critical Care Occupational Therapist, Kings College Hospital

Speaker's biography

Penelope qualified as an Occupational Therapist in 2008 and is a specialist in critical care and neurology.  Penelope also holds a bachelor of science in psychology and completed the European Masters of Science in Occupational Therapy in 2019. Penelope is clinical lead Occupational Therapist at King’s College Hospital in London.  Penelope leads a large team of occupational therapists providing occupational rehabilitation for patients in critical care units at the trust. Penelope is passionate about promoting good quality recovery from critical illness and the role of occupational therapy in this.  Penelope completed her master research exploring patient’s experience of occupation during critical illness and has published with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s THRIVE collaborative regarding the importance of critical care follow-up. Penelope continues to be active in research in the UK and works nationally to enhance the role of occupational therapy and promote the importance of occupation during critical illness recovery.

Miss Danielle Bear

Principal Critical Care Dietitian, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

Speaker's biography

Danielle obtained her Nutrition and Dietetics degree at the University of Wollongong and after working for a short time in Sydney, she moved to London and has been the Principal Critical Care Dietitian at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust(GSTT)for the last 10 yearsDanielle was one of two dietitians on the trial management group for the CALORIES Trial and she has recently completed prestigious Health Education England / National Institute for Health Research (HEE/NIHR)Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship where she is exploring the measurement and prevention of skeletal muscle wasting during critical illness and the effect on recovery.

Dr Jackie McRae

Associate Professor and Director of Research, Centre for Allied Health, St George’s University of London and Consultant Speech and Language Therapist, University College London Hospitals

Speaker's biography

Dr Jackie McRae is a Consultant Speech and Language Therapist with over 30 years’ experience working with patients with complex dysphagia in intensive care units. Her research interests focus on optimising the multi-professional management of acute cervical spinal cord injury patients with early interventions. She has had two NIHR funded research awards and developed best practice recommendations based on international consensus to enhance respiratory management, dysphagia care and nutritional support and improve clinical and quality of life outcomes. In her academic role, she mentors, supervises and supports allied health professionals on their research journey. During the first wave of the COVID pandemic, she worked at NHS Nightingale and continued her clinical work at UCLH. She is involved in national and international groups focusing on the clinical management of this novel disease and its impact on laryngeal functions.

Dr Bronwen Connolly

Senior Lecturer, Critical Care, Queen’s University Belfast

Speaker's biography

Dr Bronwen Connolly is a critical care physiotherapist, and Senior Lecturer in Critical Care at Queen’s University Belfast, UK.  The recipient of three previous NIHR Fellowships (Doctoral, Postdoctoral, Clinical Trials), her research interests focus on acute respiratory and rehabilitation physiotherapy, the recovery, long-term outcome, and survivorship of post critical illness patients, and clinical trial methodology around complex rehabilitation interventions.  Dr Connolly is the Chief Investigator of the MARCH trial, a large, NIHR-funded, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of mucoactive drugs in acute respiratory failure.  Her other work includes the development of a core outcome set for trials of physical rehabilitation in critical illness (PRACTICE).  Bronwen is also a co-investigator on the NIHR-funded RECOVERY-Respiratory Support trial studying the effectiveness of CPAP, high-flow nasal oxygen, and standard oxygen therapy in patients with COVID-19.

Dr Joanne McPeake

Nurse Consultant, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Senior Honorary Clinical Lecturer, University of Glasgow and THIS Institute Research Fellow, University of Cambridge

Speaker's biography

Joanne’s principle research interest is related to long term outcomes following critical illness.  Specifically, she is focussed on how the social determinants of health influence recovery in this group. Joanne is actively engaged in working with patients, carers and the lay public in the design, execution and dissemination of research activities. She has set up various patient forums and has published and held research grants with patients and caregivers.  Her work has informed Scottish Government policy, including the CMO (Scotland) Realising Realistic Medicine annual report and the Scottish Government’s Health Literacy Action Plan.   Joanne has also recently led the development of an international white paper examining the use of peer support as a mechanism to support recovery in critically ill patients. Joanne, alongside Dr Tara Quasim, has led the development implementation, scale-up, and evaluation of the Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) programme in Scotland over the last five years.  This innovative programme has received a number of awards including the BMJ Innovation into Practice Award (2016).  She also leads an international collaboration aimed at improving long term outcomes for patients and caregivers following critical illness (@CAIROrg). At present, Joanne is PI on a number of national and international studies and collaborates with colleagues from Australia, the USA and Canada. Joanne was awarded the Society of Critical Care Medicine Presidential Citation Award (2018 and 2019) for services to the critical care community.

Professor Tim Walsh

Chair of Critical Care, University of Edinburgh

Speaker's biography

Tim Walsh is Director of Research & Innovation for NHS Lothian, and Health Innovation South East Scotland. He is also Professor of Critical Care at the University of Edinburgh and Honorary Consultant in Critical Care at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. He is Head of the Academic Dept of Anaesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine in the University of Edinburgh, and Co-director of Acute Care Edinburgh a multidisciplinary research grouping in the University of Edinburgh Usher Institute. Tim leads a multidisciplinary clinical research group with interests including transfusion medicine, sedation in the critically ill, recovery from critical illness and the epidemiology and prevention of ICU acquired infection. He has a particular interest in large pragmatic clinical trials, complex health intervention trials, and the evaluation of novel diagnostics and technologies in acute care. He is a past Chairman of the NIHR UK Critical Care Research Network and UK Critical Care Research Group.

Professor Louise Rose

Professor of Critical Care Nursing, King’s College London

Speaker's biography

Professor Louise Rose, RN, PhD is a Professor of Nursing at King’s College London, UK and an honorary Professor in Critical Care and the Lane Fox Respiratory Unit at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. She has recently moved from Toronto, Canada where she was an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto and the Research Director for the Provincial Centre of Weaning Excellence at the Michal Garron Hospital. Her research program focuses on improving outcomes and the healthcare experience of mechanically ventilated patients across the care continuum from the emergency department, intensive care unit, specialized weaning centre and in the home. In addition, she has extensive clinical experience in critical care nursing including bedside, managerial and clinical education roles incorporating cardiothoracic, paediatric and trauma specialty units, as well medical and surgical intensive care units. Since commencing her research career she has been awarded 90 peer reviewed research grants and has over 160 peer reviewed publications.

Agenda

View the programme

Welcome and introduction

Dr Peter Shirley, President, Critical Care Medicine Section, Royal Society of Medicine

The psychology of early recovery

Professor Stephen Brett, Professor of Critical Care, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London and Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Inches make champions

Dr Eve Corner, Lecturer in Physiotherapy, Brunel University London

Critical care recovery: What can we do?

Penelope Firshman, Clinical Lead Critical Care Occupational Therapist, Kings College Hospital

Panel discussion
Break

Chair: Professor Tim Walsh, Chair of Critical Care, University of Edinburgh

The hunger games: Can early feeding affect long-term outcomes?

Miss Danielle Bear, Principal Critical Care Dietitian, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

Optimising the pleasures of eating, drinking and talking for the intensive care unit patient

Dr Jackie McRae, Associate Professor and Director of Research, Centre for Allied Health, St George’s University of London and Consultant Speech and Language Therapist, University College London Hospitals

Core outcomes for physical rehabilitation

Dr Bronwen Connolly, Senior Lecturer, Critical Care, Queen’s University Belfast

Panel discussion

Critical Care Medicine Section: Poster prize presentations

Clinical outcomes of patients surviving an ITU admission with COVID-19, what happened next?

Dr Laura White, Internal Medicine Trainee (IMT2), Royal Free Hospital

A Retrospective Analysis of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption on Outcomes in ICU

Dr Iona Lennie, Foundation Year Two Doctor, Dumfries and Galloway Royal Infirmary

Is a good NEWS "good news" for patients being discharged from ITU?

Dr Shirwa Sheik Ali, Department of Anaesthesia, St Richards Hospital

Break

Chair: Professor Stephen Brett

Critical illness recovery: Moving beyond physiology

Dr Joanne McPeake, Nurse Consultant, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Senior Honorary Clinical Lecturer, University of Glasgow and THIS Institute Research Fellow, University of Cambridge

Triaging patients at intensive care unit discharge: How might we operationalise personalised support?

Professor Tim Walsh

Priorities of care for patients and family with persistent or chronic critical illness

Professor Louise Rose, Professor of Critical Care Nursing, King’s College London

Panel discussion
Closing remarks

Location

Online

Man searching computer

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