About this event

  • Date and time Tue 1 Jun 2021 from 5:55pm to 8:00pm
  • Location Online
  • Organised by Clinical Neurosciences

The last webinar in The Brain Series: Reading and writingwill examine 'reading' and how complex the everyday task of reading is by exploring brain development, some pathologies that can affect our reading skills, and how we creatively use this skill in healthcare. 

The Brain Series: Reading and writing is an insightful online series that highlights these everyday complex tasks with fascinating underlying neurological processing involving language, cognition, and motor skills.

Experts will explain how one learns these skills, and how they may be organised in the brain. We will explore the difficulties some children experience as they attempt to acquire these skills and the curious disorders that develop when they are affected by pathology.  

Topics to be covered:

  • To explore the vicissitudes of normal reading acquisition in children 
  • Understand how patients with stroke or neurodegeneration can present with a reading disorder  
  • Strategies to treat reading disorders 
  • Learn how teaching critical reading and thinking in childhood can ameliorate a family's healthcare literacy 

 

The Brain Series: Reading and writing  

Reading and writing are skills of key importance in the modern world. They are both complex tasks with fascinating underlying neurological processing involving language, cognition, and motor skills.  

These webinar lectures will look at how one learns these skills, and how they may be organised in the brain. We will explore the difficulties some children experience as they attempt to acquire them and the curious disorders that develop when they are affected by pathology.  

In the last session of each webinar aspects of reading and writing impacts on medico-social issues will be explored. For reading, that will be by examining how teaching children to read their world critically leads to changes in health behaviours. And in writing, Wikipedia has produced an online community of writers and editors who can potentially impact international health inequalities, maybe you might join in? 

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Key speakers

Professor Kathy Rastle

Professor of Cognitive Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK. 

Professor Rastle will be giving a lecture on How does the brain learn to read? 

Dr Zoe Woodhead

Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK. 

Dr Woodhead will be giving a lecture on Networks and short circuits in reading.

Speaker's biography

Zoe is a Cognitive Neuroscientist, with over 14 years of research experience studying acquired reading disorders and how to treat them. Her work combines neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI and magnetoencephalography) and novel computer-based reading therapies, with a view to understand: (1) the neural networks involved in reading; (2) how reading is affected by damage to those networks; and (3) the neuroplastic changes that underlie reading recovery.

 

Zoe completed her PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience at Imperial College, London, working with Professor Richard Wise to understand the neural networks involved in word recognition and the causes and consequences of acquired reading disorders after brain injury. In her postdoctoral work at University College London, this led to a clinical trial for word reading therapy in aphasia. This research has been used to produce an evidence-based reading therapy app called ‘iReadMore’, which was released on the Google Play Store earlier this year.

 

Zoe now works at the Department for Experimental Psychology at Oxford, where she continues to research the cognitive neuroscience of language.

Mr Dara Glynn

Primary School Principal, CBS Primary, An Edmund Rice School, UK. 

Mr Glynn will be giving a lecture on Reading the world - a course for children.

Speaker's biography

In this modern, internet-driven, text-rich era, the need to process and critique health information presented to us has become very important. The ability to read can subvert nearly as much as it can empower an individual’s decision making. Good, accessible, evidence-based habits and skills are only now beginning to catch up with the misinformation age.

 

Dara Glynn has been a Primary School Principal for 17 years with the last 8 of those at CBS Primary in Ennis, a town in the West of Ireland. Not afraid to become a fresh-faced student again, he recently completed a research masters in NUI, Galway. The topic of his M.Sc., which focussed on the Informed Health Choices programme, has an overlapping interest with the theme of this webinar. This critical thinking, health literacy programme for 10-12-year-old children is designed to provide a counter-balancing toolkit to our regular exposure to health misinformation.

Agenda

View the programme

Welcome and introduction

Dr Bridget MacDonald, President, Clinical Neurosciences Section, Royal Society of Medicine 

How does the brain learn to read?  

Professor Kathy Rastle, Professor of Cognitive Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London 

Networks and short circuits in reading 

Dr Zoe Woodhead, Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford 

Reading the world - a course for children 

Mr Dara Glynn, Principal, CBS Primary, Ennis, Eire   

Panel discussion
Close of meeting

Location

Online

Disclaimer: All views expressed in this webinar are of the speakers themselves and not of the RSM nor the speaker's organisations.

Special rates for difficult times 
The RSM wishes to offer healthcare professionals continued learning opportunities during the coronavirus pandemic. The RSM’s ​weekly COVID-19 Series ​webinars remain free of charge, while there will be small charges to register for other online education. These fees will enable the RSM to continue its programme of activities and will apply during the course of the pandemic.

Registration for this webinarA will close 2 hours prior to the start time. You will receive the webinar link 2 hours before the meeting. Late registrations will not be accepted.

This webinar will be recorded and stored by the Royal Society of Medicine and may be  distributed  in future on various internet channels. 

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