About this event

  • Date and time Thu 23 Sep 2021 from 6:00pm to 7:15pm
  • Location Online
  • Organised by Psychiatry, RCPsych History of Psychiatry SIG

This Mind Matters webinar will explore the implications of the professional history of psychiatry for psychiatrists today. Participants will be able to reflect on how role models may affect and influence professional development and discover what psychiatric hospitals were like during the 1960's. 

Internationally renowned historian of psychiatry, Professor Edward Shorter, will discuss the wider context of psychiatry in the 1960s. A panel discussion with psychiatrists of different generations will then explore what psychiatrists in training take from the examples – both good and bad – that are set by their seniors and role models. 

Aims of this webinar include:

  • To teach participants about the history of UK psychiatry during the 1960s, highlighting some of its leaders and controversial role models
  • To explore the implications of our professional history concerning role models for psychiatrists
  • To raise awareness of both content and method of the recent Royal College of Psychiatrists' witness seminar on UK psychiatric hospitals in the 1960s

During this webinar delegates will:

  • Learn about the historical background of, and changes in, UK psychiatric hospitals during the 1960s
  • Understand some themes emerging from the witness seminar on the topic, particularly about the impact of individuals
  • Be better equipped to reflect on: how role models may affect professional development; the effect of role models on their own careers; how others may see them as role models

This is an episode of a series of Mind Matters webinars presented by the RSM Psychiatry section. 

A CPD certificate with 1 CPD credit will be issued to those joining each webinar live and will be automatically issued after 7 days  to those who watched the webinar live in its entirety. Those who watch the webinar on-demand will receive a CPD certificate 30 days after the webinar has gone live.  

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Registration for this webinar will close 2 hours prior to the start time. You will receive the webinar link 2 hours before the meeting. Late registrations will not be accepted. 

Key speakers

Professor Edward Shorter

Professor of the History of Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

Speaker's biography

A Harvard-trained social historian, American-born Edward Shorter moved to Canada as an assistant professor of history in 1967 and completed his PhD the following year. A decade after his arrival, Shorter was promoted to a full professorship in History. His 1975 book The Making of the Modern Family launched a sub-specialty in the field and inspired him to explore the history of medicine. To gain the necessary scientific background for his next book, A History of Women’s Bodies (1982), Shorter undertook two years of a preclinical medical study. A decade later, he produced two volumes on psychosomatic medicine, the first of which, From Paralysis to Fatigue (1992) was awarded a Jason A Hannah Medal by the Royal Society of Canada in 1995. The same year he was elected a Fellow of the Society.

In 1991 Shorter moved to U of T’s Faculty of Medicine as its Jason A. Hannah Professor in the History of Medicine, and in 1996 was cross-appointed as a Professor of Psychiatry in recognition of his contributions to the history of the discipline. He is the author of numerous books on various aspects of psychiatric history, including A History of Psychiatry (1997), which was awarded the Hannah Medal in 2000; Before Prozac (2009); What Psychiatry Left Out of the DSM-5 (2015); and The Madness of Fear: A History of Catatonia (2018), co-written with Dr. Max Fink, professor emeritus of psychiatry and neurology at SUNY-Stony Brook. His latest book, The Rise and Fall of the Age of Psychopharmacology, is being published by Oxford University Press in August 2021.

Agenda

View the programme here

Welcome and introduction

Dr Claire Hilton, Historian in Residence, Royal College of Psychiatrists

Not all a barren wasteland: Leadership figures in British psychiatry, 1960s

Professor Edward Shorter, Professor of the History of Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

To be interviewed by Claire Hilton, Historian in Residence, Royal College of Psychiatrists

Professor Tom Burns, Emeritus Professor of Social Psychiatry, Oxford University;

Dr Ananta Dave, Consultant Psychiatrist, Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust;

Dr Tom Stephenson, Trainee Psychiatrist, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust;

Professor Edward Shorter, Professor of the History of Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

Question and answer session
Close of meeting

Location

Online

More from this series:

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In this webinar, Professor Andrew Forrester will discuss his interest in prisons and healthcare provision in the context of human rights and social justice. We will learn Professor Forrester's views on marginalization and the adequacy of care and treatment of incarcerated groups, and hear about his ideas to effect change and improvements in institutions and across healthcare systems. 

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Disclaimer: All views expressed in this webinar are of the speakers themselves and not of the RSM.

Registration for this webinar will close 2 hours prior to the start time. You will receive the webinar link 2 hours before the meeting. Late registrations will not be accepted. 

Special rates for difficult times
The RSM wishes to offer healthcare professionals continued learning opportunities during the coronavirus pandemic. The RSM’s ​weekly COVID-19 Series ​webinars remain free of charge, while there will be small charges to register for other online education. These fees will enable the RSM to continue its programme of activities and will apply during the course of the pandemic.

All webinars will be available for registered delegates 30 days after on Zoom. The link will be sent 24 hours after the webinar takes place. 

This webinar will be recorded and stored by the Royal Society of Medicine and may be distributed in future on various internet channels. 

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